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SUPREMEeX is a Philadelphia-based producer stacking his chips and eating swordfish. He built this webpage for you so you can check out all the lovely sounds and visuals. So drop him a line and buy some of his stoof.  
   
 
     
 
 



Resource: Spine Magazine, 2002
Website: www.spinemagazine.com

> The Entity/SUPREMEeX/Hieroglyphics 'Droppen The Bomb'

Definitely a slept-on project, as it's been out a little while now and I haven't heard anyone mention it at all, this is gonna be one for all the Hiero fans out there. This is a storybook album - and it's definitely on the next-ish. Tajai from Souls Of Mischief plays a 'nonotech lifeform' who breaks out of his circuit to destroy humanity. Huh?! What?! Beats are produced by SUPREMEeX, vocals by The Entity (and special guests, such as JayBiz and others) and the project was done along with Stinke who runs the Hieroglyphics website.

If you skip the initial complicities of the storyline and get into the music here, you'll find plenty of things to enjoy. The production borders on drum and bass in places, especially where things get futuristic, and it's easy to tell that time has been spent on the beats here. Very Celestial-eque indeed, this isn't anything like any Souls Of Mischief you've ever heard before. The first full track, 'Authentic Intelligence' is excellent - utilising the familiar Ingrid De Lambre/Eddie Def beat from 'Deep Concentration' (believe me, you'll know what I mean when you hear it) - and Tajai sounds great over it - 'I define the rhyme, design the rhyme, refine the rhyme...' he tells you as he 'ushers a new era in hip-hop'. 'DigiDestruction' sounds like Robocop and Ed209 battling it out at OCP headquarters, as the mechanical beat thumps its way through the five and a half minutes, and 'Conceptualize' has JayBiz on form again over far more complex beats than you've ever heard him over before. And it sounds pretty good.

Generally speaking, storybook or themed records are hard to work with and sometime difficult to listen to, but this is alright. The sheer fact that they went and tried something this different to the usual stuff is worthy of merit, regardless of if it will sell units. Whether it would survive repeated playing is unsure at present, but it's a worthwhile addition to your racks for anyone missing the Hiero guys. Downfalls are that your typical hip-hop part of your brain will not comprehend what's going on here - it's not going to seduce any OG Hiero heads and there's no standout 'hit' track - but if you want something a bit more progressive than usual, then this is the one.

Reviewed by: CA